Thursday, November 29, 2007

Robby's 2nd Growing post

Question 1: 1)What strategies were needed?
-I used a Ratio table, maybe some money strategies, and division and multiplication between both answers
2)How did you use these strategies?
-
For the multiplication and division between both answers part, to get 1/2 cups, I answered 12 cups by multiplying 2 2/5 (2.4) by 10 to get 24, then divide it by 2 to get 12. Then I divided 12 by 12 and then by 2 to get 1/2.
( 2.4 x 10 = 24 ÷ 2 = 12 cups 12 ÷ 12 = 1 ÷ 2 = 1/2 cups. *Then do same strategy for the ingredients and price.)
-The ratio table was basically the same information as the multiplication and division part, but with a visual aide and a little neater

3)Or How could you of used these strategies.
-The Money Strategy
-I would have used a money strategy, but it just asked you to find how much it costed, not how many pennies, nickles, and dimes you would need to give Betty to buy her snack mix. So in short, this strategy didn't really help, wouldn't get extra marks for because it didn't answered any questions, and would just be a waste of time.
4)How would you figure out the price of a 6 cup bag of Betty's Snack mix? Use a ratio table
-To get 6 cups, I would multiply the cups and price for a 2 2/4 container by 10, then divide the answer by 2, then divide it by 2 again to get 6 cups.











5)Find 3 other values (amounts of Snack Mix) that could be solved using the same ratio table. Find the $$ of your new container sizes.

-The 3 others are circled in green. For the price of 3 cups, I add
ed the price of a 1 cup and 2 cup container to get it.

Question 2:


Wednesday December 5
Question 3:

-Mark ran 7/8 of the course, Rachel ran 11/12
Equivalence - For equivalence, I would find a common denominator for 7/8 and 11/12. To get the lowest common denominator, count by the smaller denominator till 12 can equally be divided into it.
-8 ÷ 12 = *decimal number* so not the LCD (Lowest common denominator)
-16 ÷ 12 = *decimal number* so not the LCD
-24 ÷ 12 = 2 *whole number* yes.
So the LCD of 7/8 and 11/12 is 24. To turn 8 into 24, u have to multiply it by 3, and multiply the numerator by 3 too. 7 x 3 = 21 / 24
24 is double of 12 * times 2 *. So multiply 11 by 2 to get the nu
merator over 24.
11 x 2 = 22 / 24
7 / 8 = 21 / 24
11/12 = 22 / 24
From looking at this, 11/12 is larger than 7/8 because, when the LCD is found between both fractions, the numerator is larger making the value larger as well.
-This Strategy says that Rachel ran more than Mark
Fractions show operations -What this means is that fractions are simpler forms of decimal numbers. For example, instead of looking at a decimal number like 0.3333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333 (0.3 repeater), you could just use the fraction 1/3 to save space and have the same value -The operation fractions show is division. 7 / 8 = 7 divided by 8 is 0.875 (87.5% of the track)
11/12 = 11 divided by 12 is 0.916 (91.6% of the track)
By looking at this, the larger decimal
and percent number means that that person ran farther than the other person (Mark and Rachel).

-This, in another way, means something like this:
7/8 (how far of the RACE course Mark ran)
x26 (how many total miles the RACE course is)
-------
or
11/12 (how far of the RACE course Rachel ran)
x 26 (total miles of RACE course)
------------

Ratio Tables (Proportional Reasoning) -This strategy simplifies finding the decimal form with partial addition. For example, if the course Mark and Rachel ran was 26 miles, Mark ran 7 / 8 of the course. 7 / 8 can be looked at as 4 / 8 (half of 26 which is 13) + 3 / 8 [remainder of addition for 7 (4 + 3 = 7)] To find 3 / 8, you could divide 13 by 4 to find 1 / 8 and multiply it by 3. 13 ÷ 4 = 3 . 25 x 3 = 9. 75. 13 + 9.75 = 22. 75 / 26, which is how far Mark ran in miles.
Measurement -
This strategy is a visual diagram of the race course and how far both Rachel and Mark ran. Partial Products or the Distributive Property The Whole Matters Friendly Fractions












On the top is Mark's and on the left is Rachels. The measurement is in miles and the % is how much of the total (26) they ran.

Partial Products or the Distributive Property - This strategy is simply finding the amount of miles for 1 / 8 or 1 / 12 and adding them together till u get 7/8 and 11/12.
1 / 8 +
1 / 8 + 1 / 8 + 1 / 8 + 1 / 8 + 1 / 8 + 1 / 8 = 7 / 8
(1/8 = 3.25 miles)
3.25 +
3.25 + 3.25 + 3.25 + 3.25 + 3.25 + 3.25 = 22.75

1 / 12 + 1 / 12 + 1 / 12 + 1 / 12 + 1 / 12 + 1 / 12 + 1 / 12 + 1 / 12 + 1 / 12 + 1 / 12 + 1 / 12 = 11/12
(1/12 = 2.16)
2.16 + 2.16 + 2.16 + 2.16 + 2.16 + 2.16 + 2.16 + 2.16 + 2.16 + 2.16 + 2.16 = 23.76
The Whole Matters - This is not much a strategy, but more like a rule. It means that you can't compare 2 fractions unless the whole is same. Like the whole is 26 miles on this course. If Rachel ran a 12 mile course and Mark ran a 8 mile course, Mark would have to run less than Rachel but would have a smaller fraction to go on ( Mark's would be / 8 and Rachel's /12 ). So the whole matters.
Friendly Fractions - Friendly fractions are fractions that are easy to do equations with, like fractions with the same denominator and u have to add them, or doing any kind of equation with unit fractions. For example, 1/6 + 2/6 = 3/6. The denominator doesn't change. 1 /6 + 1/2 = 4/6. 1/2 of 1/6 is 3/6, so 3/6 + 1/6 = 4/6. And so forth


Question 4:

  1. Group 1 Sally Bob, Gidget and Biff Share 3 pizzas.
  2. Group 2 Stan, Holly, Barry, Ben and Ichkabibble share 4 pizzas.
  3. Group 3 Eric, Susy,James, Betty, Veronica and Moose share 5 pizzas.
  4. Group 4 Paul, Alex, Chris, Jughead, Archie, Reggie, Mr. Wotherspoon and Midge share 7 pizzas.


How much pizza does each student get in the different groups?
-Group A : 3/4 of a pizza each
-Group B :4/5 of a pizza each
-Group C :5/6 of a pizza each
-Group D :7/8 of a pizza each


Which group gets the largest portion of pizza?
-Group D
Show how you found your answer in 2 different ways.
-I simply made a fraction, making the denominator represent how many people there are and the numerator represent how many pizzas there are.
-2 ways you could use to find the answer is by dividing the numerator by the denominator to get a decimal number and compare it:
3/4 = 0.75
4/5 = 0.80
5/6 =0.8(3 repeater)
7/8 = 0.875

You can see easily that the largest decimal is 0.875 belonging to 7/8, so group D has the most pizza to eat each. But one other way you could answer this is by find a LCD (lowest common denominator) that all these fractions go into. What I would do to find the lowest common denominator is to get help with some basic rules of the denominators of the fractions. Like 5, the end answer has to be a 0 or 5. 6 always has a end number of 0, 6, 2, 8, and 4. So since only 1 of the numbers come up as a 0, i have to count by that because the rule has to work with ALL the other denominators. The number that ends in a 0 is 30. 30 is divisible by 5 and 6, but not 8 and 4, so keep going.
60, no because 8 x 8 = 64. That's the closest you'll get to the number without having a decimal after it.
90, no because 8 x 11 = 88. So there's going to be a remainder
120, hmmmm, reasonable with 5 and 6. 4 goes into it 30 times *whole number*. and 8....YES because 8x5 = 40. Counting by 40's, you can easily get to 120 in 3 jumps. So the lowest common denominator of 4, 5, 6, 8 is 120.

Now the semi harder part, keeping the balance by multiply the numerator as well to suit 120 and then compare.

3 / 4. 120 ÷ 4 = 30. 30 x 3 = 90 / 120
4 / 5 . 120 ÷ 5 = 24. 24 x 4 = 96 / 120
5 / 6 . 120 ÷ 6 = 20. 20 x 5 = 100 / 120
7 / 8. 120 ÷ 8 = 15. 15 x 7 = 105 / 120
From looking at this, 7/8 has the closest LDC number to 120. So it is the largest =P
What strategies did you use in finding your answer.
-I used lowest common denominators, and finding the decimal form and compared
Show your answer is 2 different ways.
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2 comments:

Robby 8-16 said...

I think i did a good job on this growing post. I couldn't take any photos because paint would have been much faster for me to do it with and I didn't finish the investigations in class and couldn't take a picture of it.
For 5 hours straight of working on this, I think i should get a decent mark, like 23/25 or something...

Rome8-16 said...

Growing Post Question 1 Betty's Snack Mix Total (14/15 marks)

Answers all questions 5/5 marks (1 per Question)

Quality of Answers 9/10 marks

Growing Post Question 2 (6/10 marks)

Embeds the voicethread after question 1 (1/1 mark)
Creates the Voicethread to answer Question (1/1 marks)
Add Comments to further elaborate on the strategies used (0/4 marks)
Math work is correct in the voicethread (4/4 Marks)Not in the voice thread but still answered all of them right.

Bonus marks for any person doing more than 4 questions (No Bonus Marks)

Growing Post Question 3 (14/14 marks)

Uses Pictures or a voicethread to answer the question (3.5/3.5 Marks)
Explains the 7 strategies using 7/8 and 11/12 (7/7 Marks)
Comments on the voicethread (3.5/3.5 marks)

Question 4 Sharing Pizza's (14/15 marks)

Clearly shows How much pizza does each student get in the different groups? (3/4 marks)
Shows which group gets the largest portion of Pizza (2/2 marks)
Show how you found your answer in 2 different ways. (4/4 marks)
What strategies did you use in finding your answer. Student must show strategy and explain how it was used.(2/2 marks)
Added comments on voicethread or added detail to explanations (2/3 marks)

Total Math Work (48/54 marks)


Formatting (20/21 Marks)

Proper title (2/2 Marks)
Proper labels (3/3 marks)
Only one post and no drafts left in dashboard (2/2 marks)
Questions are in the proper order (4/4 Marks)
Post looks pleasing (9/10 Marks)

Pictures are lined up, text is left justified etc

The post looks professional and not piecemeal.

Completing Self Evaluation and leaving a comment (10 Marks)
Completing 2 Peer Evaluations Leaving comments on the Growing Post and Voicethreads (20 marks) 10 marks per student

Total Marks for Growing Post (105 Marks)

68/75
for everything except the self evaluation and comments.

98/105
IF you did the comments and self evaluation.


Good job Robby! The only reason you lost marks was because you could of explained your voicethreads better and added comment.